West Papua independence petition is rebuffed at UN

Exiled leader Benny Wenda presents smuggled petition to decolonisation committee but chair says Indonesian takeover of province is not on its agenda 

A citizen of West Papua signs the banned petition
West Papua citizen signs petition banned by Indonesia but reportedly endorsed by 70% of province’s population. Photograph: National Committee for West Papua
 

The UN’s decolonisation committee will not accept a petition signed by 1.8 million West Papuans calling for independence, saying West Papua’s cause is outside the committee’s mandate.

In New York on Tuesday, the exiled West Papuan leader Benny Wenda presented the petition – banned by the Indonesian government, but smuggled across Papua and reportedly endorsed by 70% of the contested province’s population – to the UN’s decolonisation committee, known as the C24 and responsible for monitoring the progress of former colonies towards independence.

The petition asked the UN to appoint a special representative to investigate human rights abuses in the province and to “put West Papua back on the decolonisation committee agenda and ensure their right to self‐determination … is respected by holding an internationally supervised vote”.

“In the West Papuan people’s petition we hand over the bones of the people of West Papua to the United Nations and the world,” Wenda said of the document. “After decades of suffering, decades of genocide, decades of occupation, we open up the voice of the West Papuan people which lives inside this petition. My people want to be free.”

But on Thursday the chair of the decolonisation committee, Rafael Ramírez, said no petition on West Papua could be accepted because the committee’s mandate extended only to the 17 states identified by the UN as “non-self-governing territories”.

“I am the chair of the C24 and the issue of West Papua is not a matter for the C24. We are just working on the counties that are part of the list of non-self-governing territories. That list is issued by the general assembly.”

“One of the principles of our movement is to defend the sovereignty and the full integrity of the territory of our members. We are not going to do anything againstIndonesia as a C24.”

West Papua was previously on the committee’s agenda – when the former Dutch colony was known as Netherlands New Guinea – but it was removed in 1963 when the province was annexed by Indonesia as Irian Jaya.

Ramírez, Venezuela’s representative to the UN, said his office was being “manipulated” for political purposes. Ramírez did not say the petition had not been presented to the committee, only that it was not able to accept it.

“As the chairman of the C24, not any formal document, nothing.”

Asked if he had any communication with Benny Wenda, or the West Papuan independence movement, Ramirez replied: “As the chairman of the C24, that is not possible. We [are] supposed to receive just the petitioners that are issued on the agenda.”

In a statement, Ramírez said that he supported Indonesia’s position that West Papua was an integral part of its territory.

“The special committee on decolonisation has not received nor can receive any request or document related to the situation of West Papua, territory which is an integral part of the Republic of Indonesia.”

Indonesia’s representative to the UN, Dian Triansyah Djani, is a vice-chair of the decolonisation committee.

Spokesman for the Indonesian embassy in Canberra Sade Bimantara said the provinces of Papua and West Papua were sovereign parts of Indonesia: “This fact is indisputable and internationally recognised.

“In 1969 the United Nations reaffirmed Indonesia’s sovereignty over West Papua.”

In response, independence campaigner Wenda, who was granted political asylum in the UK in 2003, told the Guardian that Indonesia’s denial of the petition was further demonstration of its head-in-the-sand attitude to Papuan self-determination.

“The unprecedented petition of 1.8 million signatures of West Papuans has been delivered to the United Nations to remind the UN of the legacy of its failure to supervise a legitimate vote in 1969 and its ongoing duty to complete the decolonisation process.”

Indonesian-controlled Papua and West Papua form the western half of the island of New Guinea. Political control of the region has been contested for more than half a century and Indonesia has consistently been accused of human rights violations and violent suppression of the region’s independence movement.

The people indigenous to the province are Melanesian, ethnically distinct from most of the rest of Indonesia and more closely linked to the people of Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, Vanuatu, Fiji and New Caledonia.

Formerly the Netherlands New Guinea, Papua was retained by the Dutch after Indonesian independence in 1945 but the province was annexed by Jakarta in 1963.

Indonesia formalised its control over West Papua in 1969 when its military hand-picked 1,026 of West Papua’s population and compelled them into voting in favour of Indonesian annexation under a UN-supervised, but undemocratic, process known as the Act of Free Choice.

A 2004 report by the International Human Rights Clinic at Yale Law School said: “Indonesian military leaders began making public threats against Papuan leaders … vowing to shoot them on the spot if they did not vote for Indonesian control.”

Known as Irian Jaya until 2000, it been split into two provinces, Papua and West Papua, since 2003. They have semi-autonomous status.

Many Papuans regard the Indonesian takeover as an illegal annexation and the OPM (Free Papua Movement) has led a low-level insurgency for decades. That insurgency has long been the excuse for significant military involvement in Papua.

With the heightened police and military presence, there have been reports of security force abuses including extrajudicial killings, torture, arbitrary detention, excessive use of force and mistreatment of peaceful protesters. Dozens of Papuans remain behind bars for peaceful demonstration or expressing solidarity with the independence movement.

There is little independent scrutiny of the situation in West Papua, as human rights organisations and journalists are restricted from visiting.

Posted 

Papua New Guinea Prime Minister Peter O’Neill has cast doubt on whether an independence referendum will go ahead for the autonomous region of Bougainville because key conditions have not been met.

Part of the peace agreement that ended a decade-long secessionist conflict between Bougainville and Papua New Guinea was the proposal to hold a referendum on independence before 2020.

Bougainville needs to meet certain criteria before the referendum can be held, Mr O’Neill told PNG’s Parliament.

“That includes a proper establishment of rule of law, proper establishment of a government structure on Bougainville, proper disposal of weapons — so all those issues are yet to be met, Mr Speaker, as we speak today,” he said.

“I don’t want Papua New Guineans and Bougainvilleans to think that it’s an easy path, that we’ll just wake up tomorrow and have a referendum.

“It may be such that it’s not possible.”

Mr O’Neill told MPs the PNG Government would help Bougainville resolve the problems, but did not give details.

“We need to work between now and then to work harder in making sure that we attend to the issues that are clearly defined and stated in the peace agreement,” he said.

“I want to assure the [Autonomous Bougainville Government] and the people of Bougainville that we are there to work with them in resolving these issues.”

‘A secret petition demanding a new independence referendum for West Papua has been presented to the United Nations.

The Indonesian Government banned the petition in the provinces of West Papua and Papua, threatening that those who signed it will be arrested and face jail.

But the document was smuggled between villages where it has been signed by 1.8 million West Papuans, more than 70 per cent of the province’s population.

Advocates argue that West Papuans have been denied a legitimate self-determination process, since it was incorporated into Indonesia in 1969.

The petition demands a free vote on West Papua’s independence as well as the appointment of a UN representative, to investigate reports of human rights violations by Indonesian security forces.

The Prime Minister of Solomon Islands, Manasseh Sogavare, said the petition was incredibly important and the people of West Papua had effectively already voted to demand their self-determination.

“They have come in numbers to express their hope for a better future,” Mr Sogavare said in his UN General Assembly speech.

Australian Foreign Minister Julie Bishop said Australia had long recognised Indonesia’s sovereignty over the Papua provinces.

“This is a bipartisan position in Australia, underlined by the Lombok Treaty between Australia and Indonesia which came into force in 2008,” she said.

“Indonesian sovereignty is also widely recognised by the international community.”

United Liberation Movement for West Papua spokesman Benny Wenda said signing the petition was a “dangerous act” for West Papuans, with 57 people arrested for supporting the petition, and 54 tortured by Indonesian security forces during the campaign.

“The Global Petition for West Papua, run in tandem with the West Papuan People’s Petition, was also targeted and the platform that initially hosted it, Avaaz, was blocked throughout all of Indonesia,” he said.

Jason Macleod, of University of Sydney’s Department of Peace and Conflict Studies, said the petition needed to be understood as a “fundamental rejection” of the Indonesian Government’s claim of sovereignty over West Papua.

“In a very clear and direct manner, the petition represents Papuans’ demand for decolonisation and self-determination, their desire to freely and fairly determine their own future,” Dr Macleod said.

Vanuatu PM rejects Kilman foreign policy advice

Vanuatu’s Prime Minister Charlot Salwai has described criticism of his government’s foreign policy by his predecessor Sato Kilman as misleading.

In comments to RNZ International this week, Mr Kilman suggested that the government was not being consistent with its foreign policy.

The Prime Minister of Vanuatu Charlot Salwai.
The Prime Minister of Vanuatu Charlot Salwai. Photo: ITU Pictures / R. Farrell

Vanuatu governments have long been vocal globally on the issues of human rights abuses in Indonesia’s Papua region and the West Papuan self-determination cause.

But according to Mr Kilman, who is currently an opposition MP, Vanuatu was not taking the same stands with similar issues in other parts of the world.

In response, Mr Salwai said his government had always been consistent in supporting decolonisation of what he calls “countries who are still colonised by other countries”.

The prime minister mentions New Caledonia, Bougainville and Western Sahara as examples.

Mr Salwai says his government’s policy on Papua was advanced with widespread support of ni-Vanuatu, because the country felt it couldn’t turn a blind eye to human rights violations in Papua.

According to him, customary chiefs, church leaders, woman leaders and the wider grassroots community were strongly behind the government on the issue of West Papua.

It was only in Mr Kilman’s time as prime minister that the Vanuatu government stand on West Papua changed significantly, with closer ties being sought with Jakarta.

Although Mr Kilman said he still believed the right thing to do was to keep communication lines open with Indonesia, he has been criticised himself for undermining Vanuatu’s foreign policy on West Papua because of this.

Mr Salwai said that the issue of West Papuan independence could not be separated from violation of human rights. He said the violation of human rights was happening in West Papua as a response to the struggle for independence.

That Mr Kilman’s criticism of the current Vanuatu government came in the same week that Mr Salwai attended the UN general Assembly in New York where he made a another call for international action on Papua was not lost on the prime minister.

Accoring to Mr Salwai, the opposition had been simultaneously trying to muster numbers to move a motion of confidence against him, with Mr Kilman the likely alternative choice for prime minister.

The attempt was unsuccessful as Mr Salwai currently enjoys strong support within the parliament.

Annual stoush in New York over West Papua

It’s become an annual stoush in New York.

Pacific leaders call for an investigation into killings and various alleged human rights abuses against West Papuans by Indonesian security forces.

The long-running complaint that Papuans were denied a legitimate self-determination process in the 1960s is also raised.

Indonesia then exercises its right of reply to lash out at the leaders of Solomon Islands and Vanuatu in particular.

This year however there has been a twist: the delivery of a petition by Papuan independence activist Benny Wenda purporting to have signatures of 1.8 million West Papuans demanding an internationally supervised vote on independence.

It also seeks West Papua‘s reinscription to the UN Special Committee on Decolonisation.

Manasseh Sogavare speaks at the United Nations General Assembly, September 2017.

Manasseh Sogavare speaks at the United Nations General Assembly, September 2017. Photo: UNGA

Earlier, leaders of several Pacific Islands countries showed during general debate of the 72nd Session of the United Nations General Assembly that the stand they took last year on West Papua had not abated.

Vanuatu’s prime minister Charlot Salwai accused world leaders of turning a deaf ear to more than half a century of atrocities committed against the indigenous Melanesians of Indonesia’s Papua region.

“We call on our counterparts throughout the world to support the legal right of West Papua to self-determination and to jointly with Indonesia put an end to all kinds of violence and find common ground to facilitate a process to make their own choice,” he said.

Vanuatu prime minister Charlot Salwai speaks at the UN General Assembly.

Vanuatu prime minister Charlot Salwai speaks at the UN General Assembly. Photo: UNGA

The prime minister of Solomon Islands Manasseh Sogavare picked up the thread, saying West Papuans were desperate for the international comunity to act.

He zeroed in on what he described as the empty notion of “leaving no one behind” in the UN sustainable development goals.

“Only international action by the international system, especially the United Nations, can pave the way for the recognition of a people whose right to self-determination had been denied for nearly fifty years,” said Mr Sogavare.

“Failing this, we as a family of nations will become complicit in perpetuating the suffering and being blind to the injustice, missing yet another golden opportunity to remain true to the saying of leaving no one behind.”

Solomon Islands Manasseh Sogavare at the UN General Assembly, 2017.

Solomon Islands Manasseh Sogavare at the UN General Assembly, 2017. Photo: UNGA

These calls by the Melanesian prime ministers for international action were echoed in speeches by leaders from Tuvalu and the Caribbean nation of St Vincent and Grenadines.

In reply, an Indonesian government spokeswoman categorically denied the allegations regarding Papua.

Ainan Nuran, a Third Secretary at Indonesia’s Permanent Mission in New York, accused the Melanesian leaders of being misled into supporting separatism in a sovereign nation.

“These countries were foolishly deceived by individuals with separatist agendas to exploit the issue of human rights,” she said.

“If human rights are at the heart of the issue, why were these concerns not raised in the appropriate forum, namely the 3rd Cycle of the Periodic Review of Indonesia at the United Nations Human Rights Council.”

Indonesian representative at the UN General Assembly in New York, September 2017.

Indonesian government representative Ainan Nuran responds to criticism regarding West Papua at the UN. Photo: UNGA

According to Ms Nuran, Papua and West Papua provinces had the fastest growing economies in all of Indonesia and that the indigenous West Papuans benefited greatly from this.

She told the Assembly that West Papua would always remain an integral part of her country.

However, while the stoush was playing out in the Assembly, Benny Wenda arrived at the UN with the petition signed by 1.8 million Papuans.

This petition had been banned by Indonesia and was reportedly signed in secret before being smuggled out of the country.

Mr Wenda, an exiled pro-independence leader, said the petition refuted 1969’s Act of Free Choice which sealed the sovereignty of Indonesia over Papua.

He claimed he handed the petition to the UN’s Special Committee on Decolonization, the C24, which monitors the progress of former colonies towards independence.

Subsequently, the committee’s chair and Venezuela’s representative to the UN, Rafael Ramírez, said he had received no formal petition document, and that his office had been “manipulated” for political purposes.

Will Bougainville Hold Its Independence Referendum?

The referendum is scheduled for June 2019, but the PNG premier says the criteria to do so have not been met yet.Will Bougainville Hold Its Independence Referendum?

Tensions between Papua New Guinea (PNG) and the Autonomous Bougainville Government (ABG) have again arisen concerning Bougainville’s independence referendum scheduled for June 2019. PNG Prime Minister Peter O’Neill has informed the national parliament that the criteria established in the Bougainville Peace Agreement of 2001 — which would enable the region to hold a referendum — have yet to be met. According to O’Neill, the region has yet to establish a solid rule of law, maintain functional government structures, nor has it fully disarmed the island’s militias.

However, the ABG has been arguing for some time that the PNG government has failed to live up to its financial obligations to allow the ABG the resources to fully implement the required conditions. That the PNG government earlier this year had the power cut to government buildings due to unpaid bills, and lost its vote at the United National General Assembly because of a failure to make its annual contributions, could indicate that the ABG may be justified in its complaints.

The guarantee of referendum over Bougainville’s sovereignty was one of the primary requirements of the 2001 peace agreement that was brokered by New Zealand after a civil war that had been waged for most of the 1990s. Were this agreement to be undermined, due to a failure to meet obligations by either party, then there is the potential for instability on the island to again resurface.

Enjoying this article? Click here to subscribe for full access. Just $5 a month.The position of Bougainville within PNG has always been an awkward one. Bougainville Island is geographically and ecologically part of the archipelago that forms the Solomon Islands. The archipelago became contested within the colonial endeavours of both the British and Germans. While most of the Solomon Islands came under British control in 1900, Germany maintained its hold on Bougainville Island. However, during World War I, the island was occupied by Australia, who subsequently administered it within the Territory of New Guinea. The island unilaterally declared independence as the Republic of the North Solomons several days before PNG gained it independence from Australia in 1975.  Yet the republic was never recognized by the international community, and was absorbed into the newly sovereign PNG within six months.

In 1988 the tensions derived from this uneasy relationship became funneled into a dispute involving the Panguna Copper mine, operated by Rio-Tinto. Grievances over the distribution of royalties and the environmental damage the mine was causing led to a revolt by the Bougainville Revolutionary Army (BRA) against the national PNG government, and a decade-long civil war that left up to 20,000 people dead. A truce was called in 1997, with peace talks sponsored by New Zealand beginning in 1998. In 2001 the Bougainville Peace Agreement was signed, which created the Autonomous Bougainville Government and established a roadmap towards a referendum on independence, to be held no later and 2020.

Prime Minister O’Neill’s assertion that the ABG is not living up to its obligations within this roadmap has the potential to derail the trajectory towards this independence referendum. Yet if the national government is unable to provide the financial resources for the ABG to honor these commitments, then there is an obvious impasse. If PNG is unable to provide the ABG with the resources it requires, it may fall to Australia and New Zealand to provide the necessary assistance in order to ensure that tensions do not escalate. However, this may be deemed to subvert the authority of PNG, and would potentially undermine these countries’ neutral positions on the prospect of an independent Bougainville.

The situation also poses the question of how the national government is assessing the ABG’s current situation, and whether strict interpretations of the criteria concerning “a proper establishment of rule of law, proper establishment of a government structures” are actually achievable for the region. The dominance of “big man politics” and clan affiliations within Melanesian societies has ensured Western conceptions of governance and fiscal accountability find it difficult to adapt to the local cultural landscape. The national government obviously also struggles with these tensions, and therefore should be wary of setting standards that the convergence of these two phenomenon cannot smoothly accommodate.

With the recent end to the Regional Assistance Mission to Solomon Islands (RAMSI) providing a successful transfer of full sovereignty back to the Solomon Islands government, any forces that may provoke a return to instability in the region would be of great concern to the Pacific neighborhood. The PNG government should be very weary of returning the country to the conflict of the 1990s, and seek to find a way to ensure that the Bougainville Peace Agreement continues to be adhered to by both parties.

Bougainville independence referendum ‘may not be possible’ with key conditions not met: PNG PM

Vanuatu PM accuses world leaders of ignoring West Papua

The prime minister of Vanuatu has accused world leaders at the UN of turning a deaf ear to more than half a century of atrocities committed by Indonesia on the people of West Papua.

Prime Minister of Vanuatu Charlot Salwai Photo: Supplied
Prime Minister of Vanuatu Charlot Salwai Photo: Supplied

Speaking at the UN General Assembly in New York yesterday Charlot Salwai called on the UN Human Rights Council to investigate documented cases of arbitrary killings, torture and abuse of indigenous West Papuans in Indonesia’s Papuan provinces.

Mr Salwai also appealed to world leaders to support the aspirations of the people of West Papua for a referendum on independence from Indonesia.

Photo: Supplied
Photo: Supplied

His words are translated into English:

“We also call on our counterparts throughout the world to support the legal right of West Papua to self-determination and to jointly with Indonesia put an end to all kinds of violence and find common ground to facilitate a process to make their own choice. ”

Source: http://www.radionz.co.nz

Melanesian leaders condemn UN for turning ‘a deaf ear’ to West Papua atrocities

Solomon Islands and Vanuatu leaders want investigation into alleged abuses and support for independence campaign

Charlot Salwai
Vanuatu’s prime minister, Charlot Salwai, says the people of West Papua must be allowed the right to self-determination. Photograph: Eduardo Munoz/Reuters

Melanesian leaders have accused the United Nations of having “turned a deaf ear” to human rights atrocities in the Indonesian province of Papua and urged the world to support the region’s campaign for independence.

At the UN General Assembly in New York, the prime ministers of the Solomon Islands and Vanuatu called on the UN’s Human Rights Council to formally investigate long-standing allegations of human rights abuses in the provinces.

Vanuatu’s prime minister, Charlot Salwai, said the people of West Papua must be allowed the right to self-determination, to free themselves of the “yoke of colonialism”.

“For half a century now the international community has been witnessing a gamut of torture, murder, exploitation, sexual violence and arbitrary detention inflicted on the nationals of West Papua, perpetrated by Indonesia, but the international community has turned a deaf ear to the appeals for help. We urge the Human Rights Council to investigate these cases.

“We also call on our counterparts throughout the world to support the legal right of West Papua to self-determination and to jointly with Indonesia put an end to all kinds of violence and find common ground with the nationals to facilitate putting together a process which will enable them to freely express their choice.”

The Solomons leader, Manasseh Sogavare, said the UN’s sustainable development goal motto of “no one left behind” would be “synonymous to empty promises unless we in the United Nations take active steps to address the plight of the people of West Papua”.

“Failing this, we as a family of nations will become complicit in perpetuating the sufferings and becoming blind to the injustices, missing yet another golden opportunity to remain true to the saying of ‘leaving no one behind’.”

Indonesian-controlled Papua and West Papua form the western half of the island of New Guinea. Political control of the region has been contested for more than half a century and Indonesia has consistently been accused of gross human rights violations and violent suppression of the region’s independence movement.

The people indigenous to the province are Melanesian, ethnically distinct from the rest of Indonesia and more closely linked to the people of Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, Vanuatu, Fiji and New Caledonia.

Formerly the Netherlands New Guinea, Papua was retained by the Dutch after Indonesian independence in 1945 but the province was annexed by Jakarta in 1963 and Indonesia control was formalised by a 1969 referendum widely condemned as having been fixed by the Suharto government.

Known as Irian Jaya until 2000, the province has also been split into two provinces, Papua and West Papua, since 2003.

Many Papuans consider the Indonesian takeover to have been an illegal annexation and the OPM (Free Papua Movement) has led a low-level insurgency for decades.

That insurgency has long been the excuse for significant military involvement in Papua.

With the heightened police and military presence, there have been reports of security force abuses including extrajudicial killings, torture, arbitrary detention, excessive use of force and mistreatment of peaceful protesters.

At least 37 Papuans remain behind bars for peaceful acts of free expression or expressing solidarity with the independence movement.

There is little independent scrutiny of the situation in West Papua, human rights organisations and journalists are restricted from visiting.

On taking office in 2014, the Indonesian president, Joko Widodo, pledged to boost economic development of Papua and he –ostensibly – eased restrictions on external scrutiny of the region, though travel strictures have not substantially changed. He visited the province in May.

Last month Jokowi met with Papuan civil society, church and customary leaders to discuss establishing a formal mechanism for debating Papua’s long-standing issues. However, Jakarta opposes independence and regards retention of Papua as a fundamental to its “territorial integrity”.

 

UN video sourced from the West Papua Liberation Organisation.

Pacific Media Watch Newsdesk

Vanuatu Prime Minister Charlot Salwai Tabimasmas has expressed his country’s concern about the vast flows of refugees and migrants, noting that in 2016 the number of displaced people around the world stood at 65 million during his speech today to the 72nd United Nations General Assembly.

He also appealed to France to honour the will of the people with the 2018 referendum on independence in New Caledonia due next year and appealed to the UN Human Rights Council to investigate violations in West Papua.

UN summary

An exodus to cities and a high rate of urbanisation was a challenge as well. There was a clear link between forced migration and the responsibility to protect. As a small island developing state facing rising sea levels, Vanuatu appealed to the international community to consider a legal framework to address the issue of climate change refugees.

For Vanuatu, the United Nations represented the best hope and catalyst for peace and security, as well as for lifting millions out of poverty, he said. To remain relevant, however, strategic reforms were needed. Being a permanent member of the Security Council was a responsibility and it was incumbent on the organ to move beyond the political interests of its members and to find compromise solutions. Vanuatu supported Council reforms which reflected current geopolitical trends with fairer regional representation, he said.

Vanuatu’s graduation from least developed country status did not eliminate its vulnerability to natural hazards, nor must it upset or hinder its development, he said. The transition mechanism for graduating countries must be strengthened. Conveying his government’s concern about threats to peace and security in the Asia-Pacific region, he urged the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea to halt its missile and nuclear development programme, reaffirmed Vanuatu’s commitment to the denuclearization of the Pacific and welcomed the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons.

Hurricanes and tropical cyclones around the world were warnings from Mother Nature that climate change was happening faster than efforts to respond to it, he said. Deeper thought and greater efforts were needed. Reducing greenhouse gas emissions would make a difference, he said, urging the United States to review its decision on the Paris Agreement and to implement it. He emphasized his country’s commitment to reverse the decline of the health of the world’s oceans, including through a ban on plastic bags by 2018.

Looking ahead to the 2018 referendum in New Caledonia, he urged the administration there to honour the will of its people. The Human Rights Council should meanwhile address the situation in West Papua, he said, calling for decolonisation to be put back on the United Nations radar.

Full address in French

 

Transcription by ETAN

16:55:

My government, Mr President, is worried to note that the UN has lost a lot of its capacity and will to implement Resolution 1514 of 14th December 1960 which expressed the need to put an end swiftly and unconditionally to colonialism in all of its forms and manifestations.

Ending colonialism has to reappear on the UN radar and all efforts in this regard have to be free of international political pressure. We all have a collective responsibility to guarantee self-determination to people who are under colonial yoke …

18:10:
Mr President,

For are half a century now, the international community has been witnessing a gamut of torture, murder, exploitations, sexual violence, arbitrary detention inflicted on the nationals of West Papua perpetrated by Indonesia. But the international community turned a deaf ear to their appeals for help.

We urge the Human Rights Council to investigate these cases. We also call on our counterparts throughout the world to support the legal right of West Papua to self-determination and to jointly with Indonesia put an end to all kinds of violence and find common ground with the nationals to facilitate putting together a process which will enable them to freely express their choice.